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are our troops dying and yet we just seem to go on and on talking about the fiscal cliff? well, i know that's important. mr. speaker, it is time for congress to realize that we are having young men and women to die in afghanistan for a failed policy that will not change one thing. mr. speaker, before closing, i make reference to this poster of a young american in a casket being carried by his colleagues to be buried. please, american people, put pressure on congress to bring our troops home now and not wait until december, 2014. i ask god to please bless our men and women in uniform, to please bless the loved ones who lost those in iraq and afghanistan. please, god, help get our troops home now and not later. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizing the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: mr. speaker, mitt romney weathered a storm of criticism late in the campaign after hurricane sandy for his earlier comments about privatizing fema and turning responsibility back to state and local governments. but during an era of fiscal restra
to propose a real bipartisan plan to avert the fiscal cliff that can pass both the house and the senate. withdrawing from the recommendations of the simpson- bowles commission, the president could propose a plan that would not only avert the so-called fiscal cliff, but also help us avert the yawning fiscal of this ivory for me -- it this goal -- fiscal abyss. if president obama were to offer such a plan, republicans would act favorably. going over the cliff is unnecessary. as it has been observed in "the wall street journal," the president is boxing in the republicans. he is offering them a deal they cannot accept. first, the president has repeatedly called for a balanced solution involving both revenue and less spending. what is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kiddin
the panelists together. [applause] >> looking at very aspects, dealing with the so-called fiscal cliff and today we're going to turn our attention to expiring tax credits that could families and businesses adjoining the sort that discussion is stephen sloan, to start with, could you define frat a tax credit is and how that differs from a taxom deduction? >> guest: post-credits and deductions are used to lower somebody's tax bill. they credit lower somebody's tax bill dollar for dollar. if you say you have the $1000 tax credit come your tax lowere, -- basically a reduces taxable income, so it takes the taxable income off the top. if you have a $1,000 tax deduction, that is basically a to under $50 deduction -- $250 deduction. host: on their tax credits that specifically affect families? guest: some that have expired that are part of the fiscal cliff package. they get much less attention than the bush tax cuts. they are part of the packet of decisions that congress has to make. host: we can go into debt but to highlight four --th let's start with the child tax credit. what is it? guest: this is a
. for the top 1%. i just don't see any changes from the fiscal cliff that is coming up. guest: i think there are big changes coming up. i think the president has drawn a line in the sand and let republicans know he has no intention of allowing the tax rates for the wealthiest americans to be extended again. they were extended in 2010, but i feel there is a new resolve on the part of the white house to not let that happen again. i'm not sure if all the rates will be increased as much as the president would like. it could be that they get bumped up by a point or two, instead of the 45 that he wants to increase them by. -- four or five that he wants to increase them by. if nothing changes, then tax rates go up for everybody, which would be a very big change, but i do not think that is going to happen. host: here is a tweet. christian churches are not the only ones affected by deductions. holiday donations, how is that factoring into the fiscal cliff? is there anything going on that's give them more of an argument? are they coming to washington like everyone else to have their point of vie
the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, wh
and the white house. house republican leaders have made a counter offer to president obama in the fiscal cliff negotiations proposing to cut to true knowledge with a combination of spending cuts come entitlement reform, and new tax revenues. there was a three page letter signed by speaker boehner, majority leader eric cantor, and other senior republicans including representative paul ryan. and this mornings "washington journal," we heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are
to this extraordinary country that we inherited. that being said, before we talk about fiscal cliff, we are here because of the last fiscal cliff. since we had another fiscal cliff-type scenario that created the scenario and ridiculous idea that i voted against, put a bunch of things bad to happen at one time. surprise, it didn't work and we are facing this. there are two issues number one, avoid doing damage and avoid doing harm. and we need to look for a way to accomplish that in the short-term. and we have to, we have to have a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in. it's a fact and we have to address it. i approach this issue with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write o
. >> a while ago you said that conversations continue on the fiscal cliff, but a senior g.o.p. aide said there are no talks and no private communications of any kind, no emails going back and forth. if this is the case, how can you -- >> somebody on background told you that. can i just say in answer to your question, we do not schedule meetings through the press and we do not negotiate through the press. we do not give the press our proposals before we give them to the republicans. we do not go to meetings with proposals and leak them afterwards and leak them to the press. that's not the way we are operating here. conversations continue at different levels among different groups whether there are emails exchanged at this moment, i cannot say but there are conversations taking place. the president met with scores of lawmakers last night and had conversations and i'm not going to get into the details of the conversations. inconceivable to me that there wasn't meaning of the fiscal cliff. >> watch all of this at c-span dorgan take you live of the lighting 2012 capitol lighting christmas tre
are willing to advocate for what is right. i want to talk about that today. i want to -- fiscal cliff, the last time i use that term, because it's not that, but there are serious fiscal issues we should address. i want to talk about a few things we should not be discussing and don't need to talk about and one is social security. social security does not contribute to the deficit. it's not expiring. there's no reason we have to deal with social security right now. it is one of those things that some people who never liked social security, by the way, called it socialism even, want a change and has been wanting to change for decades, so they create this imagery of crisis coming at the end of the year, then what they are trying to do is say, well, we got to change social security because of the so-called fiscal cliff, although it's not really a cliff. so this is something that really shouldn't be on the table. i want to encourage folks to really discuss and get the facts, mr. speaker, because social security is solvent through 2037. doesn't need to be fixed -- does it need to be fixed? y
of santa barbara. caller: we are in california here. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. so democrat parties are so good why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time that the unions instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns, give that money back to the membership so they can pay their own way? and as taxpayers and people like me that live on a fixed income don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we work hard to make? host: mr. welch. guest: first of all you have worked hard and -- but a couple things. number one, i can't comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. although the reports are things are starting to turn around a little bit there. and it's very tough to pass a budget when you've got that superis majority requirement. number two -- supermajority requirement. number two, how we got here, it's not unions. the wages for americans have been going down for the past 10, 15 years. people are not keeping up wi
the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of having the will to do it, the programs are out there. compromise can be made around the streamlining of regulations to make sure that we are putting people back to work. if chris christy and barack obama can get --
what happens if we go off this fiscal cliff. it's a spending decision and a tax decision, but i list them both up here. this chart comes from the congressional research service. a couple interesting things i want to point out here. first and foremost, if we do nothing, tax increases of about $400 billion, there are going to be spending reductions of about $102 billion, there are some other changes that happen at the end of the year that aren't associated with policy decisions, at the end of the day we change the scope of our deficit by about $607 billion. if we do nothing, that's what makes this such a hard issue to grapple with, mr. speaker, if we do nothing, if we reach no agreement, changes that happen automatically and burden us all in different ways, will create $607 billion for the u.s. treasury that we didn't have before. and that's only half of the annual deficit. you see all the pan damone yum that -- pandemonium folks are describing, all the frightful words used to describe the fiscal cliff, if we roll over that fiscal cliff and all of those bad things come to bear, the tax
given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker. this tax hike will hurt small businesses which provide 67% of the jobs in this country. that may fund the government for a short time. then, what's the plan? stimulus 2.0. because the first stimulus worked so well? that was a disaster as well. we have a $16 trillion deficit, and the president wants to spend more money. are you kidding me? spending is the problem. we don't need more of it. lastly, he wants the power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. the administration cannot issue an edict like a money monarchy. congress, congress, congress is in control of the purse. we have gone wild and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? mr. quigley: i ask unanimous consent to address the house
. congressional leaders continue discussions on the fiscal cliff. we're going to hear, as a matter of fact, from senate democratic leaders. a briefing scheduled for noon eastern, about 20 minutes away. we'll take you there live when it gets under way. this morning part of our week-long and couple of weeks' long conversation on the fiscal cliff, a focus this morning on the expiring tax provisions. host: today we're looking at the issue of tax extenders or tax incentives for business and individuals. and joining us in this discussion is sam goldfarb, who is a tax writer for c.q. roll call. what are tax extenders? >> well, they're temporary tax breaks. that's basically i think the most basic definition and some people are kind of concerned that the entire tax code is turning into one big tax extendser. so where do you really define it? but i think traditionally they're considered to be these pretty small provisions, narrowly targeted at specific types of businesses. some of them do apply to individuals as well. >> so why are they temporary? >> that's a good question. i think a lot of people, includ
-span.org. 8:00 eastern on c-span, negotiations on the fiscal cliff. we'll hear from harry reid and mitch mcconnell. c-span3, the impact of hurricnae ane sandy. a bipartisan group of senators spoke to reporters today about the civil war in syria and the potential use of force against the regime of bashar al-assad. >> good afternoon. i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator lieberman, senator gramm. -- graham. we are deeply disturbed by reports that bashar al-assad may have lionized -- weaponized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepare them for use in aerial bombs. these reports also suggest that his forces are awaiting orders to use these weapons. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an eminent use of weapons of mass destruction and syria, and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close, and we may instead be left with an awful and it's very difficult decision. whether to continue on the sidelines and hope that a man who has slaughtered n
to the fiscal cliff negotiations. we will show you remarks from congressional leaders on where things stand. we will hear from how speaker boehner, nancy pelosi, and senator reid. that will begin at 8 p.m. eastern here on c-span. a hearing on the rising costs of -- the rising in autism rates. there was a study released earlier this year that the rise in autism rate --it was up from a previous total. a hearing was held earlier today by the house oversight committee. we will show that later tonight at 10 p.m. eastern. and the united nations gathered in new york today. they voted to recognize the state of palestine. as upgrades to the palestinian status at the un. susan rice said in her speech that the boat places further obstacles in the path of peace. you can see the vote today in our video library at c-span.org. before the votes took place, defense secretary leon panetta that with the israeli defense minister. they also talked about iran's nuclear row graham. ran's nuclear- proi program. the program is about 40 minutes. >> it is my pleasure to welcome minister barak to the pentagon. i would lik
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16